Brexit: Spotlight

The UK formally left the EU on 31 January 2020 and is due to end transitional arrangements on 31st December 2020. We provide details on key issues that will affect businesses in the UK over the coming months and into the future.

Overview

The UK has left the European Union.  With only five months remaining of the transition period, there is very little time to prepare for a no deal exit.  Our UK law has been entwined with EU law for 47 years and impacts almost every aspect of business and our personal lives to include, financial services, health and safety, environmental, product liability, consumer protection and employment law.  The biggest impact will be the removal of the freedom of movement of goods, services, capital and people.

If you would like to discuss specific arrangements for support after the UK leaves the EU or your preparation during the transition phase or on any other questions or challenges you have, please contact us.

To keep up to date with our latest Brexit analysis please continue to check back on this page as it will be updated regularly.  You can also subscribe to our Immigration newsletter for notifications of new information as it becomes available.

Areas in which we can assist with Brexit preparations

Are you ready for Brexit?

Whether, it’s ensuring your EU staff have the correct status to remain in the UK or you need to recruit EU migrants from 2020 or you need help with right to work checks.

Our immigration team can help you and your employees who are affected by a change to their status.

Areas in which we can help:

Registering staff under the EU Settlement Scheme

Recruiting migrants – sponsor licence how to apply

Related articles:

Leaving the EU – Immigration and cross border implications

New points-based immigration system to be implemented from January 2021

Immigration updates

European law has been a key driver in employment law developments for years, from the Working Time Regulations to TUPE and beyond.  Whilst the government has given various reassurances about maintaining worker rights in the short term, Brexit will give the national government much greater flexibility in terms of how they approach employment law in future.  The EU (Withdrawal Agreement) Act 2020 also suggested that lower courts and tribunals in the UK would be able to depart from European decisions that were previously binding on them.  If this is the case we could seek much greater uncertainty in the short-term with established legal principals being overturned on a regular basis.

If you are an employer and have any concerns about the impact on your business or your employees, then please do get in touch.

Whilst much of UK commercial law does not derive from the EU, a significant proportion is still governed by or affected by EU law, such as advertising and marketing, commercial agencies, outsourcing and consumer law.  There are also the practical implications of Brexit on any business which is involved in cross-border trade and the need to ensure that its contracts prepare them for any disruption, changes on trading conditions or regulations.

Our team has been preparing for Brexit and advising on its implications for years and would be happy to discuss what practical steps you need to be taking now to prepare your business for the forthcoming changes.

Related articles:

Brexit in a nutshell?

Product safety after Brexit: are you ready?

Ready for Brexit?

Despite the government implementing the General Data Protection Regulation and agreeing to maintain equivalent protections going forward, Brexit will have an important impact on data protection for any business that transfers personal data into the UK from the EU.  Businesses need to be taking steps now to ensure that they have sufficient protections in place for such cross-border transfers and this should form part of their annual audit of data protection issues.

Our team has already successfully ensured that numerous businesses are prepared for Brexit and will be able to safely, and legally, transfer personal data after the transition period ends.  If you are unsure as to the impact on your business then please don’t hesitate to contact us.

Related articles:

Data protection – ECJ decision upholds EU standard contractual clauses but not Privacy Shield

Brexit will have serious implications for businesses seeking to protect their intellectual property, whether in relation to trademarks, copyright, design rights or website domain names.  With the government insistent that there will be no extension of the transition period these changes will be implemented from 11pm on 31st December 2020.  If you have any concerns about the protection of your own intellectual property then please do get in touch and we can give practical advice on what you need to do now.

Related articles:

Intellectual Property: What happens if there’s a No-Deal Brexit?

Resources

Here we list useful guides published by the Government:

The UK’s points-based immigration system:

An introduction for employers
An introduction for EU citizens
An introduction for EU students